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  • Amiga 1200 – holographic Checker

    Brand:Commodore
    5 out of 5
    Sold By: BadgeMan

    Amiga 1200 – holographic Checker. Printed on high quality silver vinyl (holographic) and finished with epoxy gel.

  • Amiga 1200 – Vamp 1280 badge

    Brand:Commodore
    Sold By: BadgeMan

    Amiga 1200 – Vamp 1280 badge. Printed on high quality silver vinyl (holographic) and finished with epoxy gel.

  • Dungeon Keeper Big Box

    Brand:Microsoft
    Sold By: Retro8BITShop
    • English
    • CD Version
    • Some wear and tear (the white spot) on the box

    Dungeon Keeper is a strategy video game in which the player attempts to build and manage a dungeon or lair while protecting it from invading ‘hero’ characters intent on stealing the player’s accumulated treasures and killing various monsters. This was Peter Molyneux’s final project with Bullfrog before he left the company in August 1997 to form Lionhead Studios.

    The player uses a mouse, represented in-game as a hand, to interact with a bar on the left-hand side of the screen, allowing them to select which rooms to build and which spells to cast. The player can also use the hand to pick up creatures and objects in the dungeon and carry them around, allowing for tactics such as gathering an assault force and dropping off the creatures en masse once a foothold has been established. The hand also allows the player to “slap” objects and thereby interact with them: creatures will hurry up when slapped, some traps will be triggered and prisoners in the Torture Chamber can be tortured.

    The main game view is in isometric perspective; this view can be zoomed and rotated. The player also has the option of possessing one of their creatures, and seeing the dungeon from that creature’s first-person perspective, as well as using their attacks and abilities. The map is divided into a grid of rectangles, most of which are invisible. A smaller part of the map is shown as a minimap in the top left corner of the screen.

    A world map is also available, and at the beginning of the game the player is allocated one of the 20 regions of a fictional, idyllic country to destroy. As the player progresses through these regions, each of which represents a level of the game, the areas previously conquered will appear ransacked, twisted, and evil. Before starting a new level, the Mentor will tell the player about the current region and its attributes. After completing a level, the Mentor will talk about the “improvement” of the destroyed region: “The streets run with the blood of the slain. Screams of pain and howls of anguish rip the night air like a vengeful siren’s song. This really is somewhere you can take the kids for the weekend.”

    The Dungeon Heart represents the Dungeon Keeper’s own link to the world. If it is destroyed, the player loses the level, and must restart. Along with the heart, the player begins with a small number of imps, the generic work force for all dungeon activities: they can dig tunnels into the surrounding soil, capture enemy rooms and Portals, mine gold and gems, set traps, and even attack when desperate or threatened. Slapping creatures forces them to work faster for a while, but removes some of their health and happiness.

    Once the Imps are busily working, the player must then set up a basic infrastructure: Lairs for monsters, a Hatchery (where chickens, which serve as food for the minions, are bred), and a Treasury for storing gold. After connecting the dungeon to a “Portal”, monsters will arrive. As the game progresses, the player moves along a technology tree, unlocking further rooms.

    The dungeon has a fleshed-out ecology: some creatures are natural enemies. Flies and Spiders are often found at odds with one another, while a Horned Reaper, if it has gone berserk, will attack all creatures in its path. The goals for each level are fairly straightforward: they generally fall along the lines of eliminating the heroic force or destroying all other Dungeon Keepers on the level.

  • Dungeon Keeper Big Box DUTCH

    Brand:Microsoft
    Sold By: Retro8BITShop
    • Dutch Version
    • Big Box

    Dungeon Keeper is a strategy video game in which the player attempts to build and manage a dungeon or lair while protecting it from invading ‘hero’ characters intent on stealing the player’s accumulated treasures and killing various monsters. This was Peter Molyneux’s final project with Bullfrog before he left the company in August 1997 to form Lionhead Studios.

    The player uses a mouse, represented in-game as a hand, to interact with a bar on the left-hand side of the screen, allowing them to select which rooms to build and which spells to cast. The player can also use the hand to pick up creatures and objects in the dungeon and carry them around, allowing for tactics such as gathering an assault force and dropping off the creatures en masse once a foothold has been established. The hand also allows the player to “slap” objects and thereby interact with them: creatures will hurry up when slapped, some traps will be triggered and prisoners in the Torture Chamber can be tortured.

    The main game view is in isometric perspective; this view can be zoomed and rotated. The player also has the option of possessing one of their creatures, and seeing the dungeon from that creature’s first-person perspective, as well as using their attacks and abilities. The map is divided into a grid of rectangles, most of which are invisible. A smaller part of the map is shown as a minimap in the top left corner of the screen.

    A world map is also available, and at the beginning of the game the player is allocated one of the 20 regions of a fictional, idyllic country to destroy. As the player progresses through these regions, each of which represents a level of the game, the areas previously conquered will appear ransacked, twisted, and evil. Before starting a new level, the Mentor will tell the player about the current region and its attributes. After completing a level, the Mentor will talk about the “improvement” of the destroyed region: “The streets run with the blood of the slain. Screams of pain and howls of anguish rip the night air like a vengeful siren’s song. This really is somewhere you can take the kids for the weekend.”

    The Dungeon Heart represents the Dungeon Keeper’s own link to the world. If it is destroyed, the player loses the level, and must restart. Along with the heart, the player begins with a small number of imps, the generic work force for all dungeon activities: they can dig tunnels into the surrounding soil, capture enemy rooms and Portals, mine gold and gems, set traps, and even attack when desperate or threatened. Slapping creatures forces them to work faster for a while, but removes some of their health and happiness.

    Once the Imps are busily working, the player must then set up a basic infrastructure: Lairs for monsters, a Hatchery (where chickens, which serve as food for the minions, are bred), and a Treasury for storing gold. After connecting the dungeon to a “Portal”, monsters will arrive. As the game progresses, the player moves along a technology tree, unlocking further rooms.

    The dungeon has a fleshed-out ecology: some creatures are natural enemies. Flies and Spiders are often found at odds with one another, while a Horned Reaper, if it has gone berserk, will attack all creatures in its path. The goals for each level are fairly straightforward: they generally fall along the lines of eliminating the heroic force or destroying all other Dungeon Keepers on the level.

  • Everquest the Ruins of Kunark Big Box

    Brand:Microsoft
    Sold By: Retro8BITShop

    DUTCH VERSION

    The Ruins of Kunark is the first expansion released for the EverQuest franchise.

  • King’s Quest II:Romancing the Throne

    Sold By: Retro8BITShop

    The original King’s Quest was a landmark in computer gaming. In 1984, authoress Roberta Williams designed the original King’s Quest to demonstrate the power and versatility of second generation computers. It became one of the industry’s largest sellers. Hundreds of thousands of people have played the game – and loved it. Years later, it is still viewed as a cornerstone in the development of computer adventuring.

    Another step forward in adventure design. In answer to the popularity and critical acclaim of King’s Quest II: Romancing the Throne. Romancing the Throne carries on where King’s Quest left off – both in pioneering technology and in enjoyable game play.

    King’s Quest II: Romancing the Throne takes the technologies initiated in the original King’s Quest and refines them into an art form. “It’s like playing an animated cartoon” claims Compute! magazine. The animation and music in the game are unparalleled in the realm of computer adventure.

    In King’s Quest II, Roberta Williams continues the saga of Graham, now King of the land of Daventry. His quest to rescue a princess locked away in a tower that is both miles and dimensions away. The adventure begins on a deserted beach, and will take the player to undersea worlds and into a vampires castle. The answer to Graham’s challenge lies behind a magic door and its three keys which unlock untold secrets.

    Players of the original King’s Quest will not be disappointed in this second installment of the King’s Quest saga. Consumer Software News writes “if you liked King’s Quest you’ll love the sequel” Computer Entertainment reports that ” Roberta Williams has simply outdone herself” and the Questbusters journal says that King’s Quest II has “the most lushly painted and highly detailed scenery seen since…well King’s Quest I.” By mixing the best elements of text adventures and arcade quality graphics. King’s Quest II establishes a whole new standard in computer gaming by which future games will be judged.

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